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Bipedal tool use strengthens chimpanzee hand preferences.
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Bipedal tool use strengthens chimpanzee hand preferences.

Author: S Braccini Affiliation: Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom.; S Lambeth; S Schapiro; WT Fitch
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Journal of human evolution, 2010 Mar; 58(3): 234-41
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: ElsevierArticleFirstBritish Library SerialsWorldCat
Summary:
The degree to which non-human primate behavior is lateralized, at either individual or population levels, remains controversial. We investigated the relationship between hand preference and posture during tool use in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during bipedal tool use. We experimentally induced tool use in a supported bipedal posture, an unsupported bipedal posture, and a seated posture. Neither bipedal tool use  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: S Braccini Affiliation: Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom.; S Lambeth; S Schapiro; WT Fitch
ISSN:0047-2484
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2009.11.008
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 602473726
Awards:

Abstract:

The degree to which non-human primate behavior is lateralized, at either individual or population levels, remains controversial. We investigated the relationship between hand preference and posture during tool use in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during bipedal tool use. We experimentally induced tool use in a supported bipedal posture, an unsupported bipedal posture, and a seated posture. Neither bipedal tool use nor these supported conditions have been previously evaluated in apes. The hypotheses tested were 1) bipedal posture will increase the strength of hand preference, and 2) a bipedal stance, without the use of one hand for support, will elicit a right hand preference. Results supported the first, but not the second hypothesis: bipedalism induced the subjects to become more lateralized, but not in any particular direction. Instead, it appears that subtle pre-existing lateral biases, to either the right or left, were emphasized with increasing postural demands. This result has interesting implications for theories of the evolution of tool use and bipedalism, as the combination of bipedalism and tool use may have helped drive extreme lateralization in modern humans, but cannot alone account for the preponderance of right-handedness.
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